Type 2 Gone Forever

I will be keeping my blog name “Faith Won The Day” as it fits perfectly with my goal of eliminating diabetes and I still occasionally make posts on that subject. The name “Type 2 Gone Forever” speaks for itself, freedom now and forever from diabetes!

My goal is to be consistent with both my count and checking that count more then every few days and to be at 90 to 120 daily. My count for 04/20/2020 at 9:18am = 156. I am using one of my canning 24oz Mason jars filled to the top with ice and water; I tried adding a slice of lemon however I didn’t care for it so it’s going to be just water and ice.

Below is the Facebook post I made on April 16, 2020 explaining my goal.

I’ve made for me a major decision. I currently am a type 2 diabetic and I don’t want to be a diabetic anymore! So, first step is I’m learning what diabetes is, how and why I have it and how to change. First step is changing my eating by learning exactly what I’m eating, how much and how often. I’ve never been good at maintaining journals so I think I will use my blog instead. I’m also not very truthful to myself about my eating however this is a must change! My count goes up and down daily, never consistent. My first major goal is water, I must improve my intake. I have been on pills for over 20 years, pills only no insulin but I don’t think that’s something to be proud of. Being home I’m eating like a country preacher and it’s ridiculous. I lost 68lbs and I currently work with Dr. McDonald at the University of Chicago Hospital however the weight was coming off, the diabetes remained.

Why you say are you telling us this? When I look at my church, my community, my city, we are in pain from physical illness and for me a decision must be made! Change is something I must do for self and hopefully my journey will help others. Yes, I recognize slip ups will happen however I must try.

I’m going to see what blogs are pertaining to me although I’m wondering if diabetes affects all people in the same manner. They say type 2 is from personal choice, for me I would have to say that’s true. I have access to healthy food, I don’t eat healthy. I cook and I go to restaurants, I can eat right. To be honest with self I did this to myself and as I did it to self I have to change for self. One idea I have is accountability, I function better on something like this with others. Anyone interested in joining the team? I think I’ll name it “Type 2 Gone Forever”

I’ve spent the last few days trying to learn about diabetes and I was so surprised how much information is readily available. I will post various articles and programs that will hopefully assist us on our new path. There are more than just the two types of diabetes however I will be dealing with the two primary types although I strongly suggest that you study the others for yourselves.  It is important to understand what the two major types are and how they affect the body. I have included a definition of Prediabetes which is  urgent that ALL learn thereby taking necessary steps prior to being diagnosed with Type 2.

The following definitions are from Web MD:

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/types-of-diabetes-mellitus

Prediabetes is when your blood sugar is higher than it should be but not high enough for your doctor to diagnose diabetes. More than a third of people in the United States have it, but most of them don’t know it.Prediabetes can make you more likely to get type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Exercising more and losing extra pounds, even as little as 5% to 7% of your body weight, can lower those risks.

Type 1 Diabetes:

is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, because it often begins in childhood.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It happens when your body attacks your pancreas with antibodies. The organ is damaged and doesn’t make insulin.

Your genes might cause this type of diabetes. It could also happen because of problems with cells in your pancreas that make insulin.

Many of the health problems that can come with type 1 happen because of damage to tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic nephropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). People with type 1 also have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke.

Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves injecting insulin into the fatty tissue just under your skin.

Type 2 Diabetes:

Type 2 diabetes used to be called non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes. But it’s become more common in children and teens over the past 20 years, largely because more young people are overweight or obese. About 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. (I believe this has changed especially in the black communities regardless of age)When you have type 2 diabetes, your pancreas usually creates some insulin. But either it’s not enough or your body doesn’t use it like it should. Insulin resistance, when your cells don’t respond to insulin, usually happens in fat, liver, and muscle cells.

Type 2 diabetes is often milder than type 1. But it can still cause major health complications, especially in the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, nerves, and eyes. Type 2 also raises your risk of heart disease and stroke.

People who are obese — more than 20% over their target body weight for their height — have an especially high risk of type 2 diabetes and the health problems that can follow. Obesity often causes insulin resistance, so your pancreas has to work harder to make more insulin. But it’s still not enough to keep your blood sugar levels where they should be.

Treatment for type 2 diabetes involves keeping a healthy weight, eating right, and exercising. Some people need medication, too.

PBS presented an outstanding program “Blood Sugar Rising: America’s Hidden Epidemic” which is a definite must for what was to me unknown information. I had no idea that even thin people can have type 2 diabetes and the program brought out all the fast food stores and the lack of fresh vegetables in the black and minority communities thereby creating what is called a “food desert”

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/blood-sugar-rising/home/watch

Very Well Health https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-are-food-deserts-4165971 published an article title “Food Deserts” by Robin Correll, MPH November 28, 2019 (MPH means Master of Public Health)

One of the points Dr. Correll said that I fully agree with is starting a community garden. I’m hoping that if we ever stop getting snow (I’m in Chicago and it just snowed again last week) I can start my garden. I always do containers and last year instead of placing them in the yard I put them on the deck along with flowers; we were drowning in tomato and pepper plants! (Next post let’s look at food)

 

If anyone has information to add please feel free to share. Until next time,

Love and Blessings

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